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Old 11-21-2020, 02:42 PM   #21
Gene F
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

So what is the secret to the rear engine mounts?
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Old 11-21-2020, 04:16 PM   #22
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Fitting all the wood in my 29 cabriolet. Hundreds of hours to get the fit right.
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Old 11-21-2020, 05:19 PM   #23
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Installing the special belly band around my ‘29 business coupe. If you don’t ruin it while removing it, you get a second chance at making it completely unusable during reinstallation. And the are no new repro replacements. I finally got mine reinstalled without a disaster, but it took 3 days, and it wasn’t perfect. But someone once said, "The next best thing to being an expert craftsman is being an expert at covering your mistakes."

Note: this belly band is also on sport coupes and standard couoes that have a roof that goes down to the center belt rail. Be careful of this molding piece if you have to replace your top.
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Last edited by 700rpm; 11-21-2020 at 05:26 PM.
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Old 11-21-2020, 06:15 PM   #24
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

I agree with many others. Replacing the Sport Coupe top was the hardest job. On top of that the instructions for tacking on the front were actually for a Cabriolet not a Sport Coupe.
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Old 11-21-2020, 11:07 PM   #25
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene F View Post
So what is the secret to the rear engine mounts?
A frame spreader.
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Old 11-22-2020, 09:42 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by 31 Woody View Post
Sometimes the hardest part is getting motivated. I have so many things to work on (besides the cars) that it is sometimes overwhelming. Once my hands are dirty I tend to be in a happy place, I just have to get out there.
Ditto. It's nice to hear that I am not alone. One thing I find vexing is that these cars are VERY simple in design and made to be assembled fast and easy on an assembly line and yet we spend hours/days on a single task. It's understandable with some things where the parts we are using don't fit right or need repairs but other things baffle me why it takes as long as it does when I KNOW to could;t have taken anywhere NEAR this long at the factory.
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Old 11-22-2020, 12:10 PM   #27
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Well, there's lots of input. Being in the Body and paint trade, you guys are making me feel better. The hours spent to get panels to fit and a nice paint job, I can see some of you have a idea of what it takes. JP
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Old 11-22-2020, 12:38 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Tinbasher View Post
Well, there's lots of input. Being in the Body and paint trade, you guys are making me feel better. The hours spent to get panels to fit and a nice paint job, I can see some of you have a idea of what it takes. JP
Amen, always wondered why body and paint guys are a little goofy, thought it was paint and bondo fumes
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Old 11-22-2020, 01:16 PM   #29
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JS, What's your excuse for being 'odd' ??

- A Paint Guy -
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Old 11-22-2020, 01:16 PM   #30
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Quote:
Originally Posted by 31 Woody View Post
Sometimes the hardest part is getting motivated. I have so many things to work on (besides the cars) that it is sometimes overwhelming. Once my hands are dirty I tend to be in a happy place, I just have to get out there.
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Originally Posted by ronn View Post
Sometimes the hardest part is getting motivated x2

cant tell you how many times Ive gone out to the garage to work, get side tracked, and just admire the heap of rust and wood and go back inside .....


I will share a little secret from my side of the fence. I got this trick from from my Dad and I have modified it for my business. It is very easy to get overwhelmed, ...and especially if you have multiple projects going on simultaneously. I set-up a generic 'To-do' list for each project we have going on in the shop. Many people that have visited my shop have seen these lists. For the overall project, we have each of the tasks listed on a spreadsheet by individual components, -then individual tasks needed, -and then by projected priority. Our master list has between 800 - 850 tasks listed for the overall project depending on bodystyle. Then each discipline for us (Cleaning, Wood, Sheetmetal, Paint, Upholstery, Machine, etc.) has even more detailed items broken down by component on a separate list.

For example, in the Wood area, if we are working on a Tudor, the master list just says 'Fabricate Wood' however the separate Wood list has each of the different pieces listed so they can be checked-off as they are fabricated. Naturally this is probably WAY more detailed for most home hobbyists however this list is still needed for your project. Make a list going over each facet of what you are planning on doing in your project. Make a priority of what components need to be restored, and set predecessors of that task. For example, if you have 'Restore Frame' written on your list, you need to list each of the tasks you will need to do to restore the frame. For example, before you paint the frame, you know you need to strip the frame, so list that. Before you bodywork the frame you know you need to straighten the frame. Before you straighten the frame, you need to check for and repair defects (-cracks, deep pits, missing rivets, etc.). Excel allows you to sort these tasks easily and then you print your list. On ours, we print the list in Landscape mode so we have more room for adding notes beside the task. That note might be a reminder to make sure you order & have rivets, or a replacement running board bracket, -or whatever on hand before you begin that task. Nothing wastes time & motivation like getting ready to do a particular task and not having the parts or tools at that moment to do the task.

While this seems like a lot of work (-and it is), it is a great way to stay motivated and on track with your project. When you first get into the garage, you look at your list and pick a task you will be doing first thing. This helps you resist getting side tracked as you are able to get focused immediately. Once that particular task is completed, you cross that job off your list however you don't throw away the completed list. Referring back to the list allows you to see exactly how far you have been. Also, when you are working on a particular task, as thoughts cross your mind about other type tasks on your list, add those notes to your sheet for you to refer to later. I hope this 'it works for us' idea helps someone who might seem overwhelmed.
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Old 11-22-2020, 02:13 PM   #31
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

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Originally Posted by 700rpm View Post
A frame spreader.
Actually, the first generation rear engine mounts (on the first 200 vehicles) go together more like current Float-a-Motors. There is a bracket riveted to the frame rail that a thick piece of rubber sits on. Then, there is a bracket that bolts to the flywheel housing that sits on top of that rubber block. Then, there is a rectangular cup washer with a thick piece of rubber that sits on top of the flywheel bracket. All must line up so that a large bolt with a cast round washer can go through all so that a castellated nut can be put on the lower end of the bolt. It's a chore to line everything up on both sides!
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Old 11-22-2020, 02:47 PM   #32
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Default Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Quote:
Originally Posted by BRENT in 10-uh-C View Post
I will share a little secret from my side of the fence. I got this trick from from my Dad and I have modified it for my business. It is very easy to get overwhelmed, ...and especially if you have multiple projects going on simultaneously. I set-up a generic 'To-do' list for each project we have going on in the shop. Many people that have visited my shop have seen these lists. For the overall project, we have each of the tasks listed on a spreadsheet by individual components, -then individual tasks needed, -and then by projected priority. Our master list has between 800 - 850 tasks listed for the overall project depending on bodystyle. Then each discipline for us (Cleaning, Wood, Sheetmetal, Paint, Upholstery, Machine, etc.) has even more detailed items broken down by component on a separate list.

For example, in the Wood area, if we are working on a Tudor, the master list just says 'Fabricate Wood' however the separate Wood list has each of the different pieces listed so they can be checked-off as they are fabricated. Naturally this is probably WAY more detailed for most home hobbyists however this list is still needed for your project. Make a list going over each facet of what you are planning on doing in your project. Make a priority of what components need to be restored, and set predecessors of that task. For example, if you have 'Restore Frame' written on your list, you need to list each of the tasks you will need to do to restore the frame. For example, before you paint the frame, you know you need to strip the frame, so list that. Before you bodywork the frame you know you need to straighten the frame. Before you straighten the frame, you need to check for and repair defects (-cracks, deep pits, missing rivets, etc.). Excel allows you to sort these tasks easily and then you print your list. On ours, we print the list in Landscape mode so we have more room for adding notes beside the task. That note might be a reminder to make sure you order & have rivets, or a replacement running board bracket, -or whatever on hand before you begin that task. Nothing wastes time & motivation like getting ready to do a particular task and not having the parts or tools at that moment to do the task.

While this seems like a lot of work (-and it is), it is a great way to stay motivated and on track with your project. When you first get into the garage, you look at your list and pick a task you will be doing first thing. This helps you resist getting side tracked as you are able to get focused immediately. Once that particular task is completed, you cross that job off your list however you don't throw away the completed list. Referring back to the list allows you to see exactly how far you have been. Also, when you are working on a particular task, as thoughts cross your mind about other type tasks on your list, add those notes to your sheet for you to refer to later. I hope this 'it works for us' idea helps someone who might seem overwhelmed.

Iíve seen some of Brentís lists. They are indeed impressive, and they definitely contribute to an excellent end result for the restorations.

It does help if you happen to be ďa list person.Ē (I am. My current list saved me some time over the weekend by helping me to perform several tasks in their proper order, without skipping a prerequisite.) If you are not ďa list person,Ē I could see you not wanting to take the time to make the lists.


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Old 11-23-2020, 05:50 AM   #33
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Joining what used to be a 30 Coupe cut down to Ute, to rear quarters from another cut down Coupe to make 2 complete side panels out of 4 peices.
Add in rust,cracked seams ,bullet holes and axe cuts I often thought why,,,,,,why.
Great satisfaction though.
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Old 11-23-2020, 03:28 PM   #34
BRENT in 10-uh-C
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Here is one area that I am struggling with this week!

Click here: https://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showp...6&postcount=11
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Old 11-23-2020, 06:32 PM   #35
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

I have the same situation, in reference to my Sport Coupe. I have a ton and half $ money into my project and I am searching for the best money saving possible way to tackle installing a new top. Lot me know how you make out.... dlfrisch@gmail.com
Dave
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Old 11-23-2020, 09:10 PM   #36
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Default Re: Most Difficult Restoration Tasks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Karr View Post
Actually, the first generation rear engine mounts (on the first 200 vehicles) go together more like current Float-a-Motors. There is a bracket riveted to the frame rail that a thick piece of rubber sits on. Then, there is a bracket that bolts to the flywheel housing that sits on top of that rubber block. Then, there is a rectangular cup washer with a thick piece of rubber that sits on top of the flywheel bracket. All must line up so that a large bolt with a cast round washer can go through all so that a castellated nut can be put on the lower end of the bolt. It's a chore to line everything up on both sides!
That’s interesting, Gary. I’ve never been up close and personal with any of the first 200 cars, and it’s always fun to learn something new, even after 50 years in the hobby. But I’ve worked on many later ones, and can firmly attest to the efficacy of using a frame spreader. :-)
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