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Old 01-13-2021, 05:16 PM   #1
Seabees
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Default Reamers

Howdy boys, reckon I'll ask this group also. What size reamer do I use for the following; King pins, rear brake cam, oil pump, dist., front brake actuators, and brake and clutch pedal? Thanks guys!
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Old 01-13-2021, 08:36 PM   #2
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Default Re: Reamers

You may get that information by calling one of the A parts suppliers(Berts,Snyders, or Brattons)
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Old 01-13-2021, 08:54 PM   #3
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Default Re: Reamers

I bought a set of fairly inexpensive adjustable type. They aren’t the greatest quality but have worked ok so far. I’ve done clutch shaft bushings and pedal bushings and the like with them. I didn’t have them when I did my AA kingpins so I took the spindles to a local heavy truck shop and they did them.
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:01 PM   #4
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Default Re: Reamers

Tried the vendors, they have some, but not all. Quite expensive too. Tried some adjustables, didn't get along with them very well. Somebody has to have the correct sizes, that's all I want, so I can buy a set. Thanks guys.
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Old 01-14-2021, 01:15 AM   #5
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Default Re: Reamers

Look thru Bratton's printed or online catalog. They usually list what size reamer (among other measurements in their parts description). For example front spindle bushings "Ream to .813" - .8135.

Their catalog is one of the best for tech info, better IMO than some manuals.
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Old 01-14-2021, 10:09 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Seabees View Post
Howdy boys, reckon I'll ask this group also. What size reamer do I use for the following; King pins, rear brake cam, oil pump, dist., front brake actuators, and brake and clutch pedal? Thanks guys!

You are asking a very loaded question since the quality of finish is directly related to the type of reamer used, the quality of the reamer, and how the reamer will be rotated (power vs. hand). None the less, the finished sizes that you are asking for are as follows;

....Oil Pump 0.4990"

....Distributor Shaft 0.5015

....Brake Actuator 0.5575"

....Rear Brake Cams 0.6890"

....King Pin 0.8140"

....Pedal Shafts 0.8755"

....Piston Pins 0.9905"

....Sector Housing 1.1245

Again, these are not reamer sizes but finished sizes. In the perfect world, you mic the different shafts of the items you are wanting re-bushed, and then set your clearances accordingly.
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Old 01-14-2021, 10:18 AM   #7
Tim Ayers
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Default Re: Reamers

I have a Snap-On adjustable reamer and an old .814 king pin reamer.

My question is, I seem to have trouble setting the adjustable reamer correctly. Meaning, when I measure the sizing, it fluctuates enough with the slightest movement of the caliper that it's out of spec.

When measuring an adjustable reamer, I'm assuming you want to measure the outer most edge of the cutting blades for the correct sizing.

Any tips for setting up an adjustable reamer would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
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Old 01-14-2021, 10:51 AM   #8
BRENT in 10-uh-C
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Default Re: Reamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ayers View Post
I have a Snap-On adjustable reamer and an old .814 king pin reamer.

My question is, I seem to have trouble setting the adjustable reamer correctly. Meaning, when I measure the sizing, it fluctuates enough with the slightest movement of the caliper that it's out of spec.

When measuring an adjustable reamer, I'm assuming you want to measure the outer most edge of the cutting blades for the correct sizing.

Any tips for setting up an adjustable reamer would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tim, adjustable reamers in my view are for emergency scenarios where a piece of machinery needs to be placed back in service immediately and the adjustable reamer allows for a bushing to be sized immediately, ...but not sized correctly. What you will find under a microscope is the chattering of the cutter blades make a sawtooth pattern into the bushing. The shaft is initially supported by the "teeth" or points in the bushing. As they quickly wear, the clearance becomes out of specification.
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Old 01-14-2021, 11:58 AM   #9
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Default Re: Reamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ayers View Post
I have a Snap-On adjustable reamer and an old .814 king pin reamer.

My question is, I seem to have trouble setting the adjustable reamer correctly. Meaning, when I measure the sizing, it fluctuates enough with the slightest movement of the caliper that it's out of spec.

When measuring an adjustable reamer, I'm assuming you want to measure the outer most edge of the cutting blades for the correct sizing.

Any tips for setting up an adjustable reamer would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tim - I'm not a huge fan of adjustable reamers either, but they do have their place. I never mic an adjustable reamer and then use that as the actual dimension. Instead, what I do is set the reamer well below what I expect is finished dimension, run it through, burnish the hole lightly to get rid of high points, and then measure the diameter using either gage pins or mic. If it's still too small I increase the diameter of the reamer slightly (say 1/4 turn of the adjusting nuts) and repeat until I'm satisfied. Keep track of how much the diameter of the resulting hole increases as you turn the adjusting nuts and that will give you an idea of how the reamer reacts. It's slow, yes, but if that's what you have to work with, you need to take your time.

And it's important that all parts of the adjustable reamer be clean. It relies upon the cutters moving on tapered internals, and you have to be sure all surfaces are clean or else the individual cutters don't have a chance of moving similarly when you adjust them. I take mine apart and clean thoroughly before each use and afterwards (when I remember...). Light machine oil to coat between uses.

As Brent points out, finish quality depends on a lot of things. In general, an adjustable reamer, because the cutters are individually machined and mounted on the reamer instead of gang machined out of a solid piece like a fixed-diameter reamer, will never achieve the quality finish of a good fixed-diameter reamer. And I've not seen a spiral adjustable reamer, only straight (spiral reamers have a shearing action that lends itself to a smoother cut). But for some applications where the fit is not super critical they may be sufficient. For others (e.g., kingpin, distributor) where tolerances are much tighter, I would not recommend using adjustable reamers.

My $0.02 worth.

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Old 01-14-2021, 12:09 PM   #10
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Default Re: Reamers

Many of the early King pin reamers were of a set size with slots cut in them to allow the flutes to only be expanded a small amount. They had a threaded adjuster inside with a tapered cone to force the flutes to expand. Most Ford king pins were 0.8125" so plenty of reamers were manufactured for just that size and they are generally set up for align reaming two bushings at once.

The best reamers are ones that are made for specific sizes and the ones that give the best finish generally have spiral shaped flutes with a very slight taper along the length of the flutes. I generally purchase reamers for specific sizes when I use them for soft metal bushings.

Expandable reamers with loose reamer blades are only as good as the quality with which they were manufactured. Most are not very accurate and leave too many chatter marks even when the operator is careful to expand them incrementally. They are only really usable when accuracy of cut is not that critical.
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Old 01-14-2021, 01:49 PM   #11
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Default Re: Reamers

Thanks boys, I always enjoy a little discussion about things like this, when there are several differing opinions. All are good! My preferred choice in fitting bushings is by honing, which I believe can be done with good success after reaming. I'll probably be proven wrong, but that's how I like to do it. My experience with reaming has always been on the not so good side, probably due to my inexperience in using them correctly, that and the ones I do have are probably worn out. Thanks for all your responses!
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Old 01-14-2021, 02:03 PM   #12
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Default Re: Reamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seabees View Post
Thanks boys, I always enjoy a little discussion about things like this, when there are several differing opinions. All are good! My preferred choice in fitting bushings is by honing, which I believe can be done with good success after reaming. I'll probably be proven wrong, but that's how I like to do it. My experience with reaming has always been on the not so good side, probably due to my inexperience in using them correctly, that and the ones I do have are probably worn out. Thanks for all your responses!
If I may make a recommendation, the ROI for you purchasing your own reamers will never be good for a hobbyist mechanic. If I were in your shoes, purchase extra bushings for whatever task you want (spindle bolts for example). You install the bushings yourself and then take them to an automotive machine shop that has a pin fitting machine. From experience, the set-up time takes longer than the actual honing. If you have a couple different pieces to do, then by amortizing the costs over several pairs of spindles, you will have a MUCH better job of fitment at likely a cheaper price than the purchase of a good quality reamer.
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Old 01-14-2021, 02:12 PM   #13
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Default Re: Reamers

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Originally Posted by BRENT in 10-uh-C View Post
If you have a couple different pieces to do, then by amortizing the costs over several pairs of spindles, you will have a MUCH better job of fitment at likely a cheaper price than the purchase of a good quality reamer.
Agreed - I got an entire steering column rebuilt for what it would've cost me to buy just the reamers required to do it myself (badly).
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Old 01-14-2021, 05:50 PM   #14
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Default Re: Reamers

Thanks for the advice Brent, however, automotive machines shops just don't exist here in Eastern Oregon as they did 30+ years ago. I've learned, unfortunately, that it's less time consuming to buy my own tools and learn, albeit by trial and error, to do the job myself. Heck, I might even learn something! Thanks for all your help!
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Old 01-14-2021, 08:51 PM   #15
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Thanks for the advice Brent, however, automotive machines shops just don't exist here in Eastern Oregon as they did 30+ years ago.
Don't know where you live but Places like NAPA and auto & truck repair shops usually can do this type of job. Tire shops like Les Shwab, which are in eastern Oregon should be able to hone bushings for you.
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Old 01-14-2021, 08:51 PM   #16
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Default Re: Reamers

Klamath Falls might have a technical school.
Met an instructor a couple of years ago.
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Old 01-15-2021, 10:45 AM   #17
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Napa used to have a shop, but they are no longer in business in Pendleton. Didn't know about Les Schwab, although I doubt they do it, in Pendleton anyway. I hate having someone do something I am capable of, if I just had the tools..... I'm slowly filing my tool box. And, I hate having to wait, wait, wait on someone else's time. And thanks Brentwood Bob, but Klamath Falls is about 10 hours away. Dang it!
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Old 01-15-2021, 11:57 AM   #18
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Default Re: Reamers

I have a 0.814" spindle bolt reamer (AKA King Pin reamer) that no longer cuts. Can it be sharpened to not less than 0.810" diameter?
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Old 01-16-2021, 04:26 AM   #19
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I have a 0.814" spindle bolt reamer (AKA King Pin reamer) that no longer cuts. Can it be sharpened to not less than 0.810" diameter?
Possibly Bob, you need to find a machine shop with a cylindrical grinder. Most tool and die shops can do it.
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Old 01-16-2021, 01:37 PM   #20
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Default Re: Reamers

Two things here:


1) Welcome to club and have you tried Boise? They are not that far from Pendelton.


2) I bought a set of adjustables (Lempco from 40-50's). They are the larger sizes but the teeth are all there and no chips were noticed. From the above threads, I would use them to undersize the bushing and then hone it out to final spec? Would I just use some fine sandpaper with oil and a drill?


Thanks,


Mike
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