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Old 09-25-2016, 06:58 AM   #1
stangblue
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Default Restoring Early Ford Parts

I'm re-posting this under a new thread because the thread "Part prices are killing our hobby" has digressed into an age difference between young and older early Ford hobbyist. Do you feel it's an important subject to be discussed? I believe there is always the question for the fair value in a restored part done by our hobbyist.

Parts are not cheap and certainly not your time if you value it! As we get older we seem to value our time more, I guess because we know there is less. I purchased a 1934 Ford roadster that was a basket case that was missing half the parts and I was nearing retirement and thought it would keep me busy after retirement. Well that I did for 5 yrs, hunting searching buying the wrong parts becoming educated buying the right one's, relying on body shops and people making wood etc. etc. doing most the work myself.. You know the game. If want to play you have to pay! Well that brings me to that original 33/34 Roadster windshield frame that is priced at 1,600.00 someone mentioned above. I received one with the car it was rusted, rotten in the lower corners as usual, painted silver and the glass was fogged and delaminated. Well I restored it myself taking a couple of days leisurely , brazing and soldering, gusseting and bracing the frame and then having it chromed it came out beautiful. Not keeping track of the expenses because the frame came with the car.
Now for that 1600.00 windshield. I bought a used 33/34 roadster windshield frame on Ford Barn a few yrs ago and thought if my chrome peels or what ever, I can't justify really why I bought but I did for the amount of 475.00 plus shipping lets say 500.00 total. Worked in it for a couple of days doing basically what I did above because it was in the same shape as my first one had it rechromed, the chrommer said it needed a lot of copper ect. ect you know blah, blah bringing the total cost of chroming to 600.00 plus a half day back and forth not cheap but a nice job. Now add a new windshield from Sanders Glass 150.00 with shipping. Making out of wood a jig to hold the frame too sit in so you can grind to the channel of excess copper and chrome to accept the glass and new weatherstripping around the frame and also the glass bedding, new pivot bolts and caps, wing nuts ect. 60.00. Am I getting close to 1,600.00. You can buy a repro just the frame for 900.00 to a 1,000.00 + S&H that doesn't have the curved frame and save all the labor and time and chroming. Authentic original Early Ford Parts aren't cheap! Especially to restore! What say you?
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Last edited by stangblue; 09-25-2016 at 07:31 AM.
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Old 09-25-2016, 07:21 AM   #2
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

Nothing is cheap these days! Doesn't matter if it is old car parts or not. Everything is made of gold, thus the high prices!!
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Old 09-25-2016, 07:42 AM   #3
stangblue
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

Barry-ct In my case copper,nickel and chrome!
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Old 09-25-2016, 08:24 AM   #4
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

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Authentic original Early Ford Parts aren't cheap! Especially to restore! What say you?
Hi Everyone, stangblue, I have to say this: Thank You for the time, money, and effort you contribute to restore the cars I love, and to support our hobby! It was a pleasure judging with you in Gettysburg. A real gentleman.
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Old 09-25-2016, 09:10 AM   #5
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

Very Tangled, Thank you for the kind words, my feelings are mutal towards you. IF TIME IS MONEY! What everyone please fill in the blanks for todays meaning_______________________________?
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Old 09-25-2016, 09:23 AM   #6
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To m the is all about the satisfaction of having taken something in poor and possibly unusable condition and making it useful and attractive again. Cost is not the total object.
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Old 09-25-2016, 09:35 AM   #7
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

I don't believe any basket case restoration ever comes close to returning your money. If you factor in your time it probably works out to 1/2 cent per hour. I personally work on these old Fords for the challenge, their beauty and yes, authentic parts are expensive but they fit. Everyone has their own comfort zone as to what level they want to take their car, 1000 point restoration or driver.
My avatar roadster needed me to hammer weld about 10" all around the body, replace sub-rails and floor. Fortunately I didn't have to pay anyone for that work. It was a bare body on a rotted frame when I got it but I wanted a real roadster. Restoring it would have been prohibitive considering all the one off 32 parts that were missing so I made it a 50s style hotrod with a flathead. I did restore one of my cars to be point judged, and going for points I found can be crazy expensive. Nobody would ever give me what I have invested in that car, but I didn't do it with economics in mind.
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Old 09-25-2016, 11:33 AM   #8
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

stangblue,

Just in case you obtain another roadster or phaeton with the usual rusted-out windshield frame, if you should be going to Hershey next week you may wish to stop by NC Industries spot along the northern edge of the Chocolate field. Their reproduction '33-'36 phaeton/roadster windshield frames are spot on, including the profile of the cross sections, which sets them apart from their competitors. All of the holes are where they should be and they are no where near $900.
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Old 09-25-2016, 04:56 PM   #9
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

I've seen Duece Roadster's cars up close and personal...It's awe inspiring to see what can be done to this old iron.

His points car is beyond anything I would ever be capable of!

I'm pretty new to the hobby and am learning that parts are not cheap...but buying genuine Ford parts is really the only way to go if you can find what you need. Yeah they cost more...but they fit and work. Thus avoiding costly mistakes and frustration.

Duece...your distributor job you did for me is spectacular! I only have to look at the starter button and it fires right up and idles perfectly!

Thanks!
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Old 09-26-2016, 08:27 AM   #10
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

So, I'm reading your posts and thinking "Aren't they lucky to have access to the parts they need, regardless of condition." I'm sitting up here in Canada, where it appears that every early Ford V8 has either rusted back to the earth, or been crushed to make soup cans.
As I disassemble my '40 Tudor and finding missing, incorrect and downright dumb patchwork, (who would use wire nuts for joining wires in a car?), I envy you for being able to attend a swap meet and collect parts on the "if come".
So, I guess my message is - appreciate what you have, even though it may be old, rusted and needing repair. I am looking at becoming Dennis Carpenter's best customer. When I think of having to add 20% for exchange, and shipping issues, border etc., I cringe. You could be me.
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Old 09-26-2016, 09:58 AM   #11
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by deuce_roadster View Post
I don't believe any basket case restoration ever comes close to returning your money. If you factor in your time it probably works out to 1/2 cent per hour. I personally work on these old Fords for the challenge, their beauty and yes, authentic parts are expensive but they fit. Everyone has their own comfort zone as to what level they want to take their car, 1000 point restoration or driver.
My avatar roadster needed me to hammer weld about 10" all around the body, replace sub-rails and floor. Fortunately I didn't have to pay anyone for that work. It was a bare body on a rotted frame when I got it but I wanted a real roadster. Restoring it would have been prohibitive considering all the one off 32 parts that were missing so I made it a 50s style hotrod with a flathead. I did restore one of my cars to be point judged, and going for points I found can be crazy expensive. Nobody would ever give me what I have invested in that car, but I didn't do it with economics in mind.
1/2 per hour? Man, you get paid well!

Deuce, you have summed this up quite well. Many of us, you and I definitely, do this for the love of it.
I catch a lot of flak as I rarely - if ever, drive one of my restorations. Why? Because I love the process so much more than the ride.
To me, the thrill comes from the challenge - to see what I am capable of. The other thrill? Recreating a piece of history.

As far as this hobby being "too expensive" - that all depends on one's wealth I suppose. In my opinion, this hobby is no different than any other.
My wife shows horses. Last time I checked (I try not to) that hobby is truly expensive.
Fortunately, she doesn't ask what I spend and I have learned to not want to know what she spends.
We get along quite well
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:10 AM   #12
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

Mike,

Well said! This hobby has many facets and not everyone gets a thrill out of driving an old car cross country in 90+ degree temperatures. There are lots of challenges in authentic restorations and for some when they're done they take the result out on the road and for others they move on to the next challenge even though what they've finished is virtually a new car inside and out. Does not driving a finished restoration diminish the accomplishment? I don't think so, not by a wide margin.

Variety is what makes the world go round and that pertains to this hobby as well.
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:31 AM   #13
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

As far as your plating issue, I see that you are located in Northern New Jersey. That probably is the issue. The cost is not only the labor of plating but the disposal of the spent chemicals. At one time there were several plating shops on Long Island, now there only a handful. Dealing with not only the EPA but local "red tape" puts most out of business. I have always used original restored and refurbished parts in my restorations. Sure, they might cost a little more, but you have to look at the end product. I don't care what anyone says, reproduction parts just don't cut it. I don't build my cars to make money. I just enjoy going out to my shop and accomplishing something. I love working on my cars.
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:48 AM   #14
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Default Re: Restoring Early Ford Parts

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So, I'm reading your posts and thinking "I'm sitting up here in Canada, where it appears that every early Ford V8 has either rusted back to the earth, or been crushed to make soup cans.
Isn't that the truth. In Manitoba, heavily promoted government programs encouraged people to drag in every piece of classic metal and have it crushed. Often for charity or as part of environmental programs.

Untold numbers of irreplaceable classic vehicles literally turned into soup cans.

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