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Old 09-18-2021, 06:22 PM   #1
tubman
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Default Good end to a bad start(er).

I'm sure you guys remember the problem I had with the rebuilt starter from NAPA. I'm here to report that all ended up well. I was able to return the faulty starter to NAPA without a lot of trouble, and ended up with a good starting car and an extra rebuilt starter.

I had a bunch of new bushings and brushes I had gotten several years ago, so I decided to go through the original starter. I went through my stash of cores, and found one marked "GOOD", which I installed temporarily. I immediately know that there was a problem with the original starter as it spun over at least twice as fast on the "new" starter than it had ever done before; also, the slight hesitation that incited this whole thing was gone. When we went through the original starter, we discovered a "cold solder" joint where one of the brushes was connected to the field coils. One side we had to apply a bunch of heat to unsolder the connection, while the faulty side just pulled out. We soldered in the new brushes, installed new bushings and tested the armature (my neighbor, who fixes golf carts) had a "growler").

I installed the new drive I had purchased on the newly rebuild unit, and put it "in stock". I am now running a used starter in the car, but since it works so well, it's a case of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

One thing that was kind of disappointing is that the personnel at the NAPA store treated this as an ordinary occurrence that happens every day. I'm sure that mine is an isolated case, but it still makes me wonder.
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Old 09-18-2021, 07:28 PM   #2
koates
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Default Re: Good end to a bad start(er).

I hope that you pressure oiled the new bushes before pressing them in. Need to sit the bush on your thumb and fill it with engine oil and then squeeze down on it with your other thumb so that the oil comes through the side of the bush. If you dont do that then the bush will wear out much more quickly. Most people dont know about that process. Regards, Kevin.
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Old 09-18-2021, 09:16 PM   #3
tubman
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Default Re: Good end to a bad start(er).

Did that. I used "Marvel Mystery Oil" as it was handy and let it sit for a couple of days when I was done. A friend of mine said to use "Mobil-1", but I didn't want to open a bottle just for that.

With the way we use these cars, I doubt that it will make any difference, but I felt I should do something.
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Old 09-18-2021, 09:29 PM   #4
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Default Re: Good end to a bad start(er).

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Kevin, thanks for the tip on pressure oiling the bushings before installation. I was not familiar with that technique. Regards, Zeke
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