Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-02-2016, 09:48 PM   #1
Ctillberg
Junior Member
 
Ctillberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cambridge, ONT
Posts: 12
Default Shaping new wood to fit

Hi All
Beginning to shape new front pillars and header wood in my 29 Leatherback.
Having gotten this car in a partially deconstructed state, I'm unsure as to how close these pieces need to fit.
Can anyone share some pics of a finished state of the front corners of a leatherback - or maybe all sedans look the same?
thanks a bunch.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1026.jpg (50.8 KB, 157 views)
Ctillberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2016, 10:20 PM   #2
Clatterville trolley
Senior Member
 
Clatterville trolley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mid Missouri
Posts: 129
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ctillberg View Post
Hi All
Beginning to shape new front pillars and header wood in my 29 Leatherback.
Having gotten this car in a partially deconstructed state, I'm unsure as to how close these pieces need to fit.
Can anyone share some pics of a finished state of the front corners of a leatherback - or maybe all sedans look the same?
thanks a bunch.

Whether you are working on Model A wood or a piece of wooden furniture the joints need to be as tight as possible to insure the structural integrity of the whole piece.
If there is 'slop' in the joints it will allow the body to shift making the door fit impossible to hold among other things. Don't know if this is helpful or not. Jay
Clatterville trolley is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 02-03-2016, 01:55 AM   #3
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,469
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Sorry, Mine's a 30 Town Sedan, but I did make a lot of my body wood. It helps to know that Henry Ford was a Toolmaker like myself. I say this , not to brag, but to give an idea of the skill levels necessary. The preferred wood is Ash, occasionally Maple and Walnut are used. Oak can be used but I wouldn't use it. Henry Ford worked close! The original prints had +/- .010. some sizes don't require that kind of accuracy, some do! There are very few angles and surfaces on the wood that are 90 deg. Square. And a few pieces are "keyed" into the adjacent pieces. These "Keys" (Tabs, Tongues) are angular and you must have an angle gauge in addition to a good machinist scale and Vernier Caliper. I don't mean to scare you but you should know what you're up against. If you'd like to see some pics of my attempts to make the wood for this car. Go to my profile, scroll down to "My A" and you'll see them. They're badly out order so go thru the whole batch.
Terry



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ctillberg View Post
Hi All
Beginning to shape new front pillars and header wood in my 29 Leatherback.
Having gotten this car in a partially deconstructed state, I'm unsure as to how close these pieces need to fit.
Can anyone share some pics of a finished state of the front corners of a leatherback - or maybe all sedans look the same?
thanks a bunch.
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2016, 10:36 PM   #4
Ctillberg
Junior Member
 
Ctillberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cambridge, ONT
Posts: 12
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Thanks guys, great advice, particularly re: joint fit. I will have to build up the older tenons to be snug in the new header. I'm curious how closely the steel header cover and front post covers should line up and fit together when mounted on the wood. Are they perfectly fitted together - the pic in my post shows them not really close. Not sure when that corner looks like when it's finished.
Ctillberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2016, 09:22 AM   #5
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,469
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

How do you know that the header is original?I Knew mine wasn't only because it was made of pine. This was my first A and I didn't know spit from beans. I could have duplicated what was there, and been wrong. The new header I bought from Classic Wood was much different from what was there. I would purchase the header if nothing else. It's one of the more complicated pieces of all. Also, The header is like a "soldier course" on a roof. It sort of controls a lot of other things.
Terry


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ctillberg View Post
Thanks guys, great advice, particularly re: joint fit. I will have to build up the older tenons to be snug in the new header. I'm curious how closely the steel header cover and front post covers should line up and fit together when mounted on the wood. Are they perfectly fitted together - the pic in my post shows them not really close. Not sure when that corner looks like when it's finished.
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 07:17 AM   #6
Ctillberg
Junior Member
 
Ctillberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cambridge, ONT
Posts: 12
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
All of my wood I'm sure was original, doesn't appear there have been any restorations done. My replacement parts are from ford wood, and the match up fairly close to what has come off that isn't dust. Structurally I think I'm close, except I'm struggling with dry fitting the steel. I understand the new wood will need some sanding etc, but I'm trying to get those steel parts to line up and I'm not sure how perfect they need to be....once I glue and screw the joints together, then that's it.
Ctillberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 08:26 AM   #7
BRENT in 10-uh-C
Senior Member
 
BRENT in 10-uh-C's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 9,860
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ctillberg View Post
All of my wood I'm sure was original, doesn't appear there have been any restorations done. My replacement parts are from ford wood, and the match up fairly close to what has come off that isn't dust. Structurally I think I'm close, except I'm struggling with dry fitting the steel. I understand the new wood will need some sanding etc, but I'm trying to get those steel parts to line up and I'm not sure how perfect they need to be....once I glue and screw the joints together, then that's it.
The joints and the metal need to fit tightly together on both accounts. Think of it in this scenario. How would you feel about the drywall in your home if it had a gap between it and the stud/rafter wood? How strong do you feel the house would be if the wooden joints were full of mismatched gaps & voids? A Sedan body's construction is even more crucial because of the road vibrations/twisting, and a body that is setting on a weaker foundation.

FWIW, I have found that deteriorated wood has shrunken due to moisture content being lost. We have noticed this by comparing print dimensions with the old deteriorated wood. If your new wood matches the original wood in dimensionally, I think I would be concerned.
__________________
.

BRENT in 10-uh-C
.
www.model-a-ford.com
...(...Finally Updated!! )

.
BRENT in 10-uh-C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 08:57 AM   #8
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,469
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

OK then, Be careful of your door opening sizes when you determining the length of your inner and outer nailing pieces (Stringers?) That run the length of the roof. Also, With these pieces. Watch the outer curve. When my stringers were in place there was more of a curve in the wood than the roof panel and the panels had to be forced over and I was told to use very small wood screws instead of nails to fasten the panel's end to the header.
The center posts (between the doors) have reliefs cut into the bottom sills and the outer stringer/nailer (Topwood) to locate and secure the center posts and the bottom angle bracket/brace. The top of this angle bracket must be flush with top of the sill. It cannot protrude above. Preserving the door openings is critical but very easy to over look when you have the doors open. I believe that the clearance is 1/4 " larger than the door. This is not gospel, but it was something like 1/8 all around. I hope this helps!
Terry
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 09:28 AM   #9
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,469
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Details, Details! I'm getting away from the concepts and into actuality now. First off, yours is a 29, I have a 30, big difference? I don't know! Your outer nailer/stringer looks as thought you can save it. I got the impression that all your wood was shot. Since you've already made and fitted you new header, my only suggestion is to fill up the gaps. Either with a small chip of wood or some commercial filler. The twisting and pulling will be held to a minimum.
Terry
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 02:58 PM   #10
Ctillberg
Junior Member
 
Ctillberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cambridge, ONT
Posts: 12
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

Thanks Terry. 😀😀
Ctillberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 03:00 PM   #11
Ctillberg
Junior Member
 
Ctillberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cambridge, ONT
Posts: 12
Default Re: Shaping new wood to fit

And Brent😊!
Ctillberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 PM.