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Old 10-09-2020, 07:41 PM   #21
Kurt in NJ
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

The original Fors lube for springs is shown on page 383 of the 1936 service bulletins, along with the introduction of the new springs with lubrication channels
M-4628 lubricant, 77.5% ice machine oil, 20% talc, and 2.5% ground asbestos

Ice machine oil is real thin, auto transmission oil is thion, in researching "talc" I found it is used as a polishing agent, and dry lubricant, and is used in some versions of "slip plate", the asbestos I havn't found a reason, perhaps it helps the talc at it's job, today perhaps some graphite
the way the spring is designed liquid would travel to the tips of the springs when pumped into the center---unless the spring was greased, then the lubrication grooves will only move a short distance before it is forced out the sides, and it won't flow by gravity to the tips, once grease is there it also prevents the flow of proper spring lube

My first driver car was a 46, is had the springs greased---both by me and previous owners, the tips were shedding rust, the center area oozing grease, If I stood on one side running board the car would still lean when I got off, it rode bad--hard and skittered on washboard bumps, then got a 39 (60hp) that was low mileage and most of it's life got worked on at the ford dealer by the old guy,always lubed with spring lube, when lubed the tips got wet, and when jumping off the running board the car would return to level, the ride was good, much better than the 46
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Old 10-10-2020, 10:16 AM   #22
39portlander
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Clem this is how I applied it to my Model T springs, I did have to get a tick longer center bolt that was needed due to the coating on the springs.

I used a long 3/8 threaded rod through the spring pack and clamped several areas together to compress the leaves. Drove out the threaded rod and inserted the new center bolt.

The real fun part was getting the rear leaf/shackle/spring perch together
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Old 10-10-2020, 11:06 AM   #23
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Thanks. You all are most helpful
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Old 10-15-2020, 11:57 PM   #24
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

I just received fifth wheel lube in a tube and a version in a rattle can. I will report how the application process works.
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Old 10-18-2020, 03:06 AM   #25
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

I sprayed Slip plate on the springs. I hung newspaper from the car to reduce over spray. I did find a piece of the tin spring covers between leaves?? Did the 39 pickup have spring covers?

I don't find any holes in the spring covers of my 40Merc? I had hoped to drown the noisy springs in 90wt oil.
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Old 10-18-2020, 01:35 PM   #26
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

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Talcum powder used to have more asbestos fibers in it but that is strictly forbiden in the modern era. They have been finding traces of asbestos recently in some of the talcs that aren't supposed to have any so it has led to a lot of folks discontinuing use of the stuff for there baby care products. They mostly use pure corn starch now.

My own experience with lubricating anything that is used in a dirty or dusty environment has been the use of dry lubricants such as moly coat sprays or just powdered graphite. Anything that attracts dust to stick to it just forms balls of crud until all the oil in the lubricant has been leached out into that crud ball. This is sort of like sandpaper or lapping compound and it is not good for bearings or load bearing parts on a standpoint of rapid wear. This was why Ford started using covers but that practice didn't really last all that long.
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Old 10-18-2020, 02:35 PM   #27
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Way back in the day, we would grease between the leaves, assemble the spring then wrap them with electrical tape. I don't recall what sort of grease we used.
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Old 10-20-2020, 12:36 AM   #28
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

I had a nice trip for gas in the '39 Pickup. I think the springs are a little softer.
I also upgraded a used shock.

I wanted to try another idea: I had a 1/2 load of Corn head grease in a manual grease gun. I filled the rest of the gun with 90Wt oil. Some ran out the plunger handle aperture. Some 90wt went thru the grease gun and began running out of the spring leaf stack. That aught do some good. (I have tin oil trays to catch the mess and Momma was in the house.)

Now for the squeaky 40 Merc springs with tin wrap: Somebody said some restorers use a sheet of stuff containing asbestos between springs leaves. I can't see the springs for the wrap. Could this be what is squawking?

Could I drill small holes in the wrap horizontally near the center top edge of the 2 wrap sections. Then pump 600 weight in until it runs out of the wheel ends of the wraps? Plug the holes with a insert so the holes don't show? A bud suggests heating the 600tw so it will flow better during the insertion process.
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Old 10-20-2020, 09:57 AM   #29
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Clem, what are you referring to as 600 weight? The stuff that is sold to the Model A guys? If so, several things here, first "w" doesn't stand for oil weight in general, it is for "winter" and has to do with the temperature the viscosity is measured at. Second the "w" in 600w is a brand name for a Mobile steam engine oil and was rated under a different system than what is currently used. It has a viscosity of around 140 under current SAE standards. IMO it is mostly a gimmick and nothing I would use for much of anything.

Last edited by JSeery; 10-20-2020 at 10:11 AM.
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Old 10-20-2020, 02:33 PM   #30
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Daily hero award goes to "JSeery" above. A technically correct statement and someone who knows what W stands for! Yeah.
The 600W as noted above was for high temp steam cylinder applications because it is 100% lube with no additives at all. This is good for wet steam applications as the condensate is not carried into the lube via moisture sensitive additives. It is also still used in very heavy loaded worn gear applications(sliding contact) of slow speeds as in industrial applications. This is a case where additives actually degrade the performance of a product. 100% lube is all available for lubrication. A simple but special material even today.
Yes, there is no real application required today in these old cars, but the steering box is an ideal candidate.
Keep flying the "W" is for Winter flag.
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Old 10-20-2020, 05:27 PM   #31
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Use of Slip plate to lube springs

Sorry. From a distance the can had 600w on a sticker( now removed.). The gallon can is John Deere )Yellow/black label 140w pc 550. No date.) Nasty looking stuff that will almost peak.

Last edited by Clem Clement; 10-20-2020 at 06:51 PM.
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