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Old 07-04-2020, 08:03 AM   #1
Steves46
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Default Bending Overflow Tube

The radiator overflow tube is facing towards the front and I would like to bend it so it faces the rear to possibly help cut down on water loss. Any recommendations on a good way to do this without causing a kink? Thanks. Steve
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Old 07-04-2020, 09:50 AM   #2
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Find a spring that will snugly fit the tube,then bend away slowly. A spring inside is better too bend with but the overflow tube is small.
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Old 07-04-2020, 09:51 AM   #3
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Not sure how reorienting the tube to the back will change water loss but, depending on how much bend is required, you could just add a short length of hose and ruin it wherever you want. I've never done this but one way you may be able to bend it without kinking is to put a rod in the end fro leverage and as you slowly bend the tube, lightly tap on the side where it is bending with a body hammer to keep the side from bulging out and thus causing a kink. Slowly and carefully you should be able to move it without kinking i would think. Again, I have not done this, just spitballing.
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Old 07-04-2020, 10:16 AM   #4
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Scratch awl will give you the leverage. Going to be hard to get a spring back out. I would do it commando, no spring.
Bill williamsons remedy of putting a roofing nail in the exposed end of the overflow is a great adjunct, or alternative.
Remember copper work hardens so don't fiddle with it.
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Old 07-04-2020, 10:32 AM   #5
Steves46
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Thanks all. I wound-up attaching small rubber hose and it did the trick. Just going with what was recommended in the 1930 Service Bulletin.
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Old 07-06-2020, 07:29 AM   #6
Bob Bidonde
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Leave the overflow tube as it is and do this instead. It is an orifice made from a stainless steel 1/4" diameter bolt. The hole drilled through the bolt is 0.125" diameter. Insert the bolt into the overflow tube. The radiator cap needs to be a leakless fit. Both of my Model "A" cars have this orifice, and it works really well.
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Old 07-06-2020, 07:41 AM   #7
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube-restricting overflow tube is #10 idea

What ??

Last edited by Benson; 07-16-2020 at 07:18 AM.
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Old 07-06-2020, 08:58 AM   #8
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

I can understand why folks want to make the overflow stop since it makes a mess but no matter what a person does, they won't be able to keep fluid from expanding when it gets hot. The hotter is gets, the more it expands. It has to go somewhere when the expansion space is gone.
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Old 07-06-2020, 02:17 PM   #9
Ernie Vitucci
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Good afternoon...What I did was to attach about four feet of rubber hose to the overflow tube and run it back to about where the wishbone ties in. I attached it with a bit of twisted wire every couple of feet and so any drip is under the middle of the car, in the dirt and it does not cause anything to rust...Ernie in Arizona
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Old 07-07-2020, 08:49 AM   #10
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

The relationship is Pressure x Volume / Temperature. The orifice reduces the volume lost by increasing the pressure and the temperature.
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Old 07-07-2020, 11:24 AM   #11
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Your set up is still vented although it is restricted. I don't thing the restriction is going to raise the pressure all that much. It would be heat expansion that raises the pressure the most and that would only be after losing all of the expansion space that's left. Once the liquid reaches the restrictor then it could start to build more pressure if the fluid is slow to escape through there.

There should be no problem with that unless steam pressure builds up with too low of a coolant level with resultant overheating. If there is no problems with the engine holding it's mud and the cooling system is working then that should be a functional set up as far as slowing coolant loss.

Skip Haney's 3 PSI check valve would actually hold pressure till it reached the limit but it depends on whether the old radiator can hold the pressure or not. Many of the old model A cars have the Moto-Meters or caps that don't have a very good seal. A good seal would be required to increase the pressure in the system.
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Old 07-07-2020, 07:37 PM   #12
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

My cars are drivers so an original appearance under there doesn't bother me. I run a plastic tube from the bottom of the overflow to the bottom of a bottle secured to the chassis near the rear engine mount. As the engine cools, the coolant that has been discharged from the radiator is drawn back into the top of the rad with a gurgling sound hat always attracts attention. People think it is my stomach!!!
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Old 07-07-2020, 09:45 PM   #13
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

If your cooling system is operating correctly you will only push out water till it finds a level,mine is about an inch low in the top tank..doesn't matter if I run it hard on a 90 degree plus day it holds its water..restricting the overflow tube is not a good idea unless you run a full pressurized system with a relief style cap.Roofing nails and drilled orifices can plug or stick..without a relief cap your asking for trouble..
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Old 07-07-2020, 10:32 PM   #14
Steve Kennedy
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

How, or is it even possible, to pressurize an original radiator cap for the '36 or other similar caps?
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Old 07-08-2020, 08:44 AM   #15
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Seal closed the overflow tube,run a pressure type radiator cap with a relief type tube and neck..its pretty simple.The results are a different story,pressurizing raises the boiling point. On a model A raising the boiling point is moot,160 degrees being the optimum temperature.Like any repair,find the root cause of your issue,don't 'mask' it..fix the cooling system before you allow more heat capacity.
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Old 07-08-2020, 08:44 AM   #16
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

The bung isn't designed for a pressure cap. Most of the early Fords up until around 1941 just have a rubber washer to seal the cap. This is why Skip Haney started making his 3 PSI check valve for installation in the overflow line. It allows some pressure to build to increase the boiling point without damage to the radiator if it is in good condition. As the metal tubes & tanks get thin with corrosion and repeated repairs, they tend to fatigue to the point that they will no longer hold much pressure. The cap seal has to be able to hold 3-PSI as well or even the pressure valve won't work.
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Old 07-08-2020, 09:48 AM   #17
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

I do not understand why increasing the boiling point in a Model A is desirable. Boiling/steam is a warning that your cooling system is running too hot with possible oil flash-over at the cylinder walls. By increasing the boiling point you increase the chance of running beyond being safe, beyond what was designed. Modern cars with pressurized systems are designed for the hotter temps.



Correct me if i misunderstand.
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Old 07-08-2020, 06:23 PM   #18
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

The model A was designed to run with no pressure but it did have a water pump. This was an improvement over the model T with thermosiphon technology but not by a lot since the model T could only pull so much anyway.

It's all about extremes when folks want to add pressure to the system. On very hot days where the car has to go up long steep grades is where the pressure is an advantage even if small. The car will recover after it crests the hill but it has to make it up there first. The coolant generally won't get hot enough to boil unless the engine is under stress or there is something wrong with the cooling system or too much friction in the drive system.

Ford added 4-psi caps after WWII and the 7-PSI caps came along as the cars got even heavier in the early 50s but were still using 1930s technology. With larger engines and air conditioning thrown into the mix, they went up to 14-PSI.
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Old 07-09-2020, 08:37 AM   #19
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

Thanks for the info, my 1st sentence was misleading,. I can understand why, but do not understand why someone would chance causing motor damage running hotter than designed.
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Old 07-09-2020, 03:06 PM   #20
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Default Re: Bending Overflow Tube

All these cars have the potential to overheat depending on conditions. The engine generally won't be damaged unless there it a total break down of the cooling system. Boiling coolant is a total break down in that respect because it quits cooling the engine and starts to super heat and make steam. Once that happens, the whole cooling system is compromised. Obviously, the safest thing to do is to immediately shut down the engine and hope for the best.
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