Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Early V8 (1932-53)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-09-2018, 09:40 PM   #21
tubman
Senior Member
 
tubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Minnesota, Florida Keys
Posts: 6,767
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubsyouruncle View Post
I managed to screw up the internal threads on the brass block T-fitting for my factory-installed bypass filter on a '47 v-8 engine.

Can anyone help me? I would like to start using it again.
While it doesn't state a definitive source for that part, this thread may be of help : https://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showt...filter+fitting
tubman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2018, 08:39 AM   #22
patbill@megahits.com
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Sharon, Conn.
Posts: 92
Thumbs up Re: Oil filters on flatheads

I'm the guy who posted the original thread. Wow! Lots of good thoughts and very interesting-

Thanks!

Bill::
patbill@megahits.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 01-10-2018, 10:04 AM   #23
tubman
Senior Member
 
tubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Minnesota, Florida Keys
Posts: 6,767
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by NealinCA View Post
Does anyone have a great trick to mounting a stock type oil filter on aftermarket finned aluminum heads?
Offenhauser used to make a part just for this. It was made of aluminum and bolted to the head bolts, the other side had three tapped holes that picked up the mounting points of a standard 8BA filter. I had one I picked up at the Chickashaw swap meet about 20 years ago. Unfortunately, I sold it several years ago. You might want to go to the "Exeter Speed Shop" web site where they have the entire Offenhauser catalog in pdf format. I think there is a picture of one there which may help in find one or perhaps making an analog.
tubman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2018, 11:16 AM   #24
flatheadmurre
Senior Member
 
flatheadmurre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Sweden
Posts: 3,045
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Another trick is long nuts (coupling nuts) used as spacers and a std filter that fits to the headbolts.
They come in stainless if you want it nice and shiny.
flatheadmurre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2018, 02:16 PM   #25
40 Deluxe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: now Kuna, Idaho
Posts: 3,429
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by supereal View Post
If you believe that the bypass filter isn't effective, just forget to tighten the cap when you change the element and observe the oil shower! Don't ask me how I know that! I buy the elements at a local NAPA store where they still stock them for the Ford tractor owners Old Henry Ford didn't believe in filters. That is why the intake of the Model A carb points toward the rear of the vehicle. He thought that the plentiful dust and dirt on the old roads wouldn't enter the carb as long as the car was moving forward!
That Henry Ford "quote" sounds bogus! Do you have a reliable source for it?
40 Deluxe is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2018, 02:22 PM   #26
40 Deluxe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: now Kuna, Idaho
Posts: 3,429
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
On Ford's (the company) view of bypass filters, the original manual for my 1940 states to change the oil every 2,000 miles if the engine does not have a filter. On filter equipped engines a 5,000 mile change interval is recommended, and the filter element changed every 10,000 miles.
40 Deluxe is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 04:19 PM   #27
patbill@megahits.com
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Sharon, Conn.
Posts: 92
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

I wrote the original post. I think I am convinced. This winter I will be re-installing the Ford bi-pass filter on my one flathead that does not have one. Many thanks for all of the comments and ideas. There is lots of wisdom and knowledge at the Ford Barn - great group!

Bill in Conn.
patbill@megahits.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 06:12 PM   #28
JSeery
Senior Member
 
JSeery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Wichita KS
Posts: 15,283
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

One thing to keep in mind is that a by-pass filter can filter to a much smaller micron size compared to a full-flow filter. A lot of modern diesels use by-pass filters for that reason.

Last edited by JSeery; 10-28-2018 at 06:17 PM.
JSeery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 06:57 PM   #29
34PKUP
Senior Member
 
34PKUP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 684
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
One thing to keep in mind is that a by-pass filter can filter to a much smaller micron size compared to a full-flow filter. A lot of modern diesels use by-pass filters for that reason.
Also keep in mind that the by-pass filters used on diesels are capable of a smaller micron size than the commonly used Ford replacement by-pass filters.
34PKUP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 07:04 PM   #30
JSeery
Senior Member
 
JSeery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Wichita KS
Posts: 15,283
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

What is the filtration size on the flathead filters?

Is the Wix 51006/NAPA 1006 a good number? It is rated at 32 micron.

Last edited by JSeery; 10-28-2018 at 07:12 PM.
JSeery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 07:16 PM   #31
ford38v8
Senior Member
 
ford38v8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,344
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Bypass filters, by their nature, are able to slow down the flow of oil as the filters load up, without affecting oil flow to the bearings. Modern filters must pass oil without a major drop in pressure/volume, so the finer particles are passed, and as they load up, their safety valves open to pass without filtration at all. The bypass filters not only screen out finer particles, but they require only 10 miles of driving for about 95% of all the oil to pass through the filter at least once. A feature that all oil filters share is the added total volume of oil in the system, which is helpful in keeping the engine cool, as well as preventing the oil itself from breaking down from excess heat. All cars today need a filter of some kind, due to the modern detergent oil suspending particles rather than allowing them to drop out overnight, becoming sludge in valve galleys and oil pans.
__________________
Alan
ford38v8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 07:53 PM   #32
51 MERC-CT
Senior Member
 
51 MERC-CT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: East Hartford, Ct
Posts: 5,062
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
What is the filtration size on the flathead filters?

Is the Wix 51006/NAPA 1006 a good number? It is rated at 32 micron.
Those are the normally installed replacement filters. Don't know what the micron rating is but have heard from 10 to 25 micron.
I am running an Amsoil by-pass filter rated in the 2-3 micron range, same rating as the ones used on the diesels.
In a measured test at idle speed the filter passed 5 Qts. of oil in 11 minutes.

__________________
DON'T RECALL DOING SOMETHING FOR MYSELF BASED ON SOMEONE ELSE'S LIKES OR DISLIKES

Last edited by 51 MERC-CT; 10-28-2018 at 08:00 PM.
51 MERC-CT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2018, 11:17 PM   #33
ford38v8
Senior Member
 
ford38v8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,344
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

[QUOTE=51 MERC-CT;1690436]Those are the normally installed replacement filters. Don't know what the micron rating is but have heard from 10 to 25 micron.
I am running an Amsoil by-pass filter rated in the 2-3 micron range, same rating as the ones used on the diesels.
In a measured test at idle speed the filter passed 5 Qts. of oil in 11 minutes.

so, at cruising speed, about 4+ times the volume? That sounds roughly equivalent to 20+ qts filtered to attain the 95% in 10 miles of cruising. This is sounding so good, I wonder what advantage there could be to use 100% filtered on modern cars?
__________________
Alan
ford38v8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 01:05 AM   #34
51 MERC-CT
Senior Member
 
51 MERC-CT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: East Hartford, Ct
Posts: 5,062
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

[QUOTE=ford38v8;1690494]
Quote:
Originally Posted by 51 MERC-CT View Post
Those are the normally installed replacement filters. Don't know what the micron rating is but have heard from 10 to 25 micron.
I am running an Amsoil by-pass filter rated in the 2-3 micron range, same rating as the ones used on the diesels.
In a measured test at idle speed the filter passed 5 Qts. of oil in 11 minutes.

so, at cruising speed, about 4+ times the volume? That sounds roughly equivalent to 20+ qts filtered to attain the 95% in 10 miles of cruising. This is sounding so good, I wonder what advantage there could be to use 100% filtered on modern cars?
The test was done with the engine idling with oil pressure at appox. 20#.
The .060 dia. restriction hole determines how much volume is delivered at what oil pressure.
At a higher oil pressure there may be an increased percentage of volume, but not by a factor of 4 as you speculate.
__________________
DON'T RECALL DOING SOMETHING FOR MYSELF BASED ON SOMEONE ELSE'S LIKES OR DISLIKES
51 MERC-CT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 01:23 AM   #35
ford38v8
Senior Member
 
ford38v8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,344
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

[QUOTE=51 MERC-CT;1690511]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ford38v8 View Post
The test was done with the engine idling with oil pressure at appox. 20#.
The .060 dia. restriction hole determines how much volume is delivered at what oil pressure.
At a higher oil pressure there may be an increased percentage of volume, but not by a factor of 4 as you speculate.
What was I thinking?
__________________
Alan
ford38v8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 12:11 PM   #36
JM 35 Sedan
Senior Member
 
JM 35 Sedan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Near Rising Sun, Maryland
Posts: 10,173
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

The debate to use an oil filter, or not, on a flathead engine will probably never end. Regardless of what Henry Ford did in the early days of his Flathead powered vehicles, in my way of thinking, how many modern gas or diesel engine vehicles are being produced today without an oil filter? It just makes good sense to me, if I'm working on one of my Flathead engines, and have the ability to add an oil filtering system, I'm going to do it.
__________________
John

"Never give up on what you really want to do. The person with big dreams is more powerful than one with all the facts". Albert Einstein
JM 35 Sedan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 01:03 PM   #37
Drbrown
Senior Member
 
Drbrown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Glens Falls NY
Posts: 1,244
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

For what its worth, my '47 never had a filter. It was rebuilt I don't know how many years age, now has 35,000 on rebuild, doesn't leak or burn oil, 70 lbs at cold idle/20 at hot idle, use 10w-30 and change every 1,000 miles.
Drbrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 01:16 PM   #38
tubman
Senior Member
 
tubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Minnesota, Florida Keys
Posts: 6,767
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

I'm with "JM" on this. I have just finished my 258' rebuild and I am going to look into one of those Amsoil filters for it. They look to me to be the ideal filter for these engines with the finer filter and the volume "51 MERC-CT" has posted, especially the way these cars are used. I will keep the present stock setup on my '51 Ford.
tubman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 11:49 PM   #39
dumb person
Senior Member
 
dumb person's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: South pacific island
Posts: 1,724
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Legend has it modern oils do not break down with heat nearly as fast as old oil does.
The important part is to keep your oil clean, you could reduce the changes to 20-50,000 miles and only replace the filter, if you could filter it finely enough! (Change the filter on a modern car every 1,000 KMs and see how long the oil lasts.) A bypass filter would be a great asset to modern engines.

I'll let you guy figure out how to do that.
__________________
<Link> This is how we roll<Link>

"I'm Convinced that no one really reads posts anymore; they just fabricate what they think the post says then ramble on about red herrings."--Bob
Outcasts rules of old cars
#1 Fun is imperative, mainstream is overrated
#2 If they think it is impossible, prove them wrong
#3 If the science says it impossible you are not being creative enough.
#4 No shame in recreating something you never had
#5 If it were not for the law & physics you would be unstoppable
dumb person is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2018, 09:18 AM   #40
tubman
Senior Member
 
tubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Minnesota, Florida Keys
Posts: 6,767
Default Re: Oil filters on flatheads

Quote:
Originally Posted by dumb person View Post
Legend has it modern oils do not break down with heat nearly as fast as old oil does.
The important part is to keep your oil clean, you could reduce the changes to 20-50,000 miles and only replace the filter, if you could filter it finely enough! (Change the filter on a modern car every 1,000 KMs and see how long the oil lasts.) A bypass filter would be a great asset to modern engines.

I'll let you guy figure out how to do that.
One way to do it is with a Frantz or similar type add-on filter. My dad sold them in the fifties and sixties and always added one to each new Oldsmobile he bought. Each one came with two tags. The first was like a regular old style "oil change tag" you used to stick on the door jamb. The second was the same format, but made of blotting paper and was divided up into several segments. You were to touch your dipstick into the corresponding spot every 200 miles after installing the Frantz filter. The oil would be absorbed by the blotting paper, and would show how "dirty" it was. It was amazing to watch the spots get lighter and lighter with each 200 miles that passed. It made me a believer.
tubman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:30 PM.