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Old 07-19-2020, 04:20 AM   #1
Paul Bennett
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Default WorryWart

My dash clock (50 Merc - 12v) has been refurbished and when I reinstalled it I noted the clock solenoid clicks every 5-6 minutes to pump up the wind mechanism. I formerly thought the intervals would be more like 30 minutes or an hour.

It would be nice to know how much energy is consumed each time it clicks to calculate how much it depletes the battery but that's not my question.

But I can worry that the clock could eventually drain the battery, drip drip drip.

Has anyone found the need to disconnect the clock if the car isn't run every 3months? 6months?

Or dust I worry for naught?
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Old 07-19-2020, 04:59 AM   #2
51 MERC-CT
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Default Re: WorryWart

It only uses battery energy for a split second to wind it.

I never had a problem with it for as long as 3 months.
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Old 07-19-2020, 08:17 AM   #3
51504bat
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Default Re: WorryWart

If you're worried hook up a battery maintainer.
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Old 07-19-2020, 09:07 AM   #4
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Default Re: WorryWart

When I was in the Army, I learned the proper interval for a maintenance operational check or MOC. A motor vehicle, whether it's a wheeled vehicle, a tracked vehicle, a boat, or an aircraft, should be run up every 14-days. This is considered maximum time out of service or the vehicle has to be prepped for either short term or long term storage.

If a person does this, the systems will remain usable and in good condition for a lot longer than those that set too long. Fuel doesn't last very long now days so it's very important to keep it fresh.
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Old 07-19-2020, 12:09 PM   #5
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Default Re: WorryWart

How long did you let them run?
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Old 07-19-2020, 12:55 PM   #6
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Default Re: WorryWart

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51504 bat‘s reply is the best option. Use a battery tender for idle periods longer than 2/3 months. Also you could always remove the fuse temporarily.

Some recommend a 1amp fuse in the radio. That way as the voltage drops during storage the current flow to the radio will increase and eventually cause the fuse to blow. That takes the load off of what’s left of the battery.

Over the winter I use the battery tender and also remove the fuse to reduce ware on the points in the clock.

Tom
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Old 07-19-2020, 01:04 PM   #7
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Default Re: WorryWart

Considering apples to oranges, I've had wall clocks operate for 2 years on a double A battery. Don't think you have much to worry about. 5 to 6 minutes sounds about right. 51 Merc is correct, it's just a split second.
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Old 07-19-2020, 06:45 PM   #8
51 MERC-CT
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Default Re: WorryWart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jersey Devil View Post
Over the winter I use the battery tender and also remove the fuse to reduce ware on the points in the clock.

Tom
To me it makes more sense to disconnect the clock to reduce arcing buildup on the clock points than to disconnect it to save the battery.
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Old 07-19-2020, 07:13 PM   #9
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Default Re: WorryWart

Quote:
Originally Posted by 51 MERC-CT View Post
To me it makes more sense to disconnect the clock to reduce arcing buildup on the clock points than to disconnect it to save the battery.
Hi Paul..........why not use a battery disconnect and get rid of all electrical worries when the car is not in use? A friend of mine had a battery tender go south on him on burned up his vehicle. Sh** happens.
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:37 AM   #10
Paul Bennett
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Default Re: WorryWart

Once upon a time I had the ability to use a battery maintainer. Battery maintainers require a house or garage. OTOH, apartment living negates having power where the car will be parked. Guess it means starting the car every 14 days and I'm anxious to hear an good answer about how long to run the engine.


And I must reread the post about connecting the clock to the battery with a fuse which blows under some conditions. Huh? As I said, a reread is in order.
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