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Old 05-18-2020, 08:25 AM   #1
AnthonyG
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Default Torque tech.

I never thought about it much until recently stripping some hardware during torquing. I typically check Spec for limits & pattern if given to make sure nothing unique then torque everything 20% under spec, Using outside to middle pattern alternating opposite positions for first cycle. Then go back on 2nd cycle to max spec, Ie, 10-15 ‘lbs I go 15 as i remember reading many things can effect actual torque final as much as reducing by as much as 50%. Since for many years I adopted using max range as final. Always thought max on range better for not coming loose! As a result of recent event requiring disassembly, Fresh Flywheel, & balancing, I’ve rethought my technique & maybe using mid range to be a better idea? While it wasn’t the 1st time I stripped a thread, it was the first time it happened while using a torque wrench per spec. My technique has been more from habit from my youth although, the “Rules for torquing & the potential 50% reduction from various conditions I read years ago still sticks in the brain! The rest of my torquing Technique is probably from torquing Enough stuff & noticing the spec’s generally followed that pattern. I can’t really remember but obviously must have copied someone’s instruction in the beginning. Thoughts?
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Last edited by AnthonyG; 05-18-2020 at 08:31 AM.
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Old 05-18-2020, 08:46 AM   #2
Gary in La.
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Default Re: Torque tech.

When was the last time your torque wrench was calibrated? They can and do go out of calibration over time with use.
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:00 AM   #3
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Default Re: Torque tech.

What Gary said.

We used to have our "click type" torque wrenches checked every six months when building government certification test vehicles. It was also recommended to set the torque to the lowest setting before putting it back in the tool box. Not below the lowest setting.. which is also possible to do. Otherwise, you're "loading" the internals which will cause it to go out of calibration faster.

My opinion is that it's best to torque from inside out rather than outside in. I think you'll find that cylinder head and intake manifold patterns use that sequence.

Of course, all threads should be clean and lightly oiled to get accurate results.

Just my two cents!
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:14 AM   #4
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Ditto on the center out protocol.
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:15 AM   #5
1931 flamingo
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Over the years how many of these cars, engines, etc been worked on in backyards and even garages with NO torque wrenches?? Just "feely", righty tighty??
Paul in CT
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:25 AM   #6
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Default Re: Torque tech.

There is also a different torque specification for dry vs lubricated. The lubricated values are lower. You can look up torque spec's online to give you an idea of different values for different bolt types, sizes, conditions, etc.
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:31 AM   #7
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Attachment 430802Mfgr Kobalt click type, Cal. Date 1-2014, I’ve had for approx 5yrs bought fairly high end click type. Only two engine builds on it. Very carefully when using & seems still pristine. Garage has dehumidifier on always. Where would I have calibration checked?
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:38 AM   #8
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Meant to type inside to out, I must b extra dyslexic this morning Typed opposite what I wanted & obviously didnt check. Thx for correction.
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Old 05-18-2020, 11:25 AM   #9
Black Fifty
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Default Re: Torque tech.

This isn't how the Snap-On dude would do it...but it should get you close. It would be better to use a more controlled method to pull on the wrench handle. And the accuracy depends on how accurate the scale is. Same thing with using weights....if it ain't certified, it may not be right!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaqBA-xSGbc

The other option would be to contact Kobalt and ask them who would service/calibrate the wrench.

Hope that helps.
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Old 05-18-2020, 12:10 PM   #10
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Default Re: Torque tech.

https://www.tekton.com/torque-wrench...nd-calibration


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Old 05-18-2020, 12:22 PM   #11
AnthonyG
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Default Re: Torque tech.

YouTube video makes sense. I got all the tools except the luggage scale. Might order on Amazon & try. I think mine is fine but will be fun check!
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Old 05-18-2020, 12:32 PM   #12
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Or use a beam scale torque wrench for both checking calibration or actual use . If treated properly a beam will rarely need calibration . Or that's what I was taught many moons ago
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Old 05-18-2020, 02:03 PM   #13
Gary in La.
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Default Re: Torque tech.

After reading that a bolt stripped threads during torquing with a torque wrench I just wanted to remind everyone that a calibrated tool may not keep its calibration forever. Having been in aircraft maintenance my entire working career these things stick with you. The helicopter company I worked for, for 39 years, had all torque wrenches checked once a year by the inspection dept. Granted, a full time mechanic turning wrenches will develop a natural feel for the correct torque in most cases. But, a backyard mechanic may not.

Last edited by Gary in La.; 05-18-2020 at 06:21 PM. Reason: correct error in description
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Old 05-18-2020, 02:10 PM   #14
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Default Re: Torque tech.

There is a cool digital adaptor that several people were talking about on the HAMB few years back. I order a couple (1/4, 3/8 and 1/2). It provides a digital readout of the torque applied. You can use it to check the calibration.

The reviews on these are mixed.
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Last edited by JSeery; 05-18-2020 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 05-18-2020, 03:29 PM   #15
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Default Re: Torque tech.

Gary's last post reminded me of another "don't" that I was taught. Don't use the torque wrench to break fasteners loose. Don't know if that's true for beam type, but that's something I recall about the click-type, even though there is functionality to use the wrench to loosen on the ones that I have.
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Old 05-18-2020, 08:03 PM   #16
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Default Re: Torque tech.

The good old bending beam torque wrench does not go out of calibration or adjustment unless you bent it or really did something terrible. If it reads zero and is all straight, use it as a standard for your clicker type wrenches, which are far more convenient to use. couple the two together with a coupling nut or a piece of hex stock and see on the beam wrench where the clicker - "clicks". use a small allen wrench to adjust the clicker through the side hole in the body of the wrench. Easy to do and will give you confidence in your clicker wrenches.
I still have my old beam wrench just for checking the newer ones. It is a lot easier than rigging up weights, scales strings or ropes etc
My opinion
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Old 05-19-2020, 08:32 AM   #17
richard crow
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Default Re: Torque tech.

back in the day when iwas young we rebuilt a lot of engines we used what we called elbow torque a good mech had the feel never had a problem .no broken bolts no striped threads
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Old 05-19-2020, 09:17 AM   #18
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Default Re: Torque tech.

When I worked for Pan Am and American, you weren’t allowed to use your own torque wrench unless it was calibrated by the company every year.
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Old 05-20-2020, 06:59 AM   #19
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Default Re: Torque tech.

My two cents. If the threads stripped then they were compromised before you even started. My experience has shown that you're more likely to brak a bolt with good threads than to strip the threads. I'll use a torque wrench on a head or intake but not on a waterpump. Once you feel the bolt tightened and add and 1/8 to a quarter turn you're good. Many newer vehicle specs call for an initial tightening plus a certain number of degrees rotation. This will keep the tension uniform and negate any difference in use of lubricants.
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Old 05-20-2020, 07:51 AM   #20
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Default Re: Torque tech.

When I was in Auto Shop in High School our first assignment was we were given a 2”x2”x6” piece of steel....we had to drill and tap a 3/8” hole......screw in a bolt till it broke off and record the torque spec when it broke. Then drill out the broken piece. Everybody’s final grade was, the instructor said “don’t break off any bolts !!”......Mark
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