Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-10-2020, 11:36 AM   #1
rfitzpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 321
Default '31 Budd Cab

I really believe if the Florida wind was just right -- I could do 90!!
When were wind-tunnels used?
rfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2020, 12:26 PM   #2
Jim Brierley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 3,481
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

90 would be really fast considering you'd be pushing a barn thru the wind! I ran my widebed on El Mirage dry lake at an SCTA event years ago it was timed at 78 mph. This is a dirt course, 1.3 miles long. I was faster than a '37 Dodge pickup that day!
Jim Brierley is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 11-10-2020, 12:39 PM   #3
CarlG
Senior Member
 
CarlG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Posts: 8,715
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

I've had mine up to 70! One time! Don't plan on making it a habit. 55 is more my speed.
__________________
Alaskan A's
Antique Auto Mushers of Alaska
Model A Ford Club of America
Model A Restorers Club
Antique Automobile Club of America
Mullins Owner's Club
CarlG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2020, 12:46 PM   #4
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 182
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Quote:
Originally Posted by rfitzpatrick View Post
I really believe if the Florida wind was just right -- I could do 90!!
When were wind-tunnels used?
Not very 'A' related, but Orville and Wilbur Wright invented the wind tunnel before the powered flights in 1903. While experimenting with gliders on Kitty Hawk they weren't getting the calculated lift and were stymied. Seeking the answer, they came up with a device to measure lift from various wing shapes. The wind tunnel was born. Their first discovery with it was that the generally accepted lift equations of the day were wrong. They designed and tested new wing shapes, and accurate lift relationships. This is just a glimpse of their genius. Those who think that Langley was first (He was backed by the US government and the Wrights were ignored at first) or Whitehead was first (Hopeless CT claim, Whitehead had no roll control or adequate lift) have not studied the Wright's brilliance, in the engine, in the wings, in realizing a propeller is an airfoil, in establishing roll control for the first time, and in their dogged persistence. It's a fascinating richly detailed story, and something I've obviously spent some time on. Including 3,000 hours in flight.
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2020, 04:43 PM   #5
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,296
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

The Smithsonian didn't want the original Wright Flyer back in 1910 when it was offered due to the Langley bias. Charles Walcott was dead set that Langley's old Aerodrome should have been the first successful powered airplane. The Smithsonian finally accepted it in 1948 and it is as original as it gets.
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitio...ght%20aircraft.

Otto Lilianthol had his trial and error information but Wilbur and Orville knew that it had to be expanded so they did their own experiments. The little wind tunnel did the trick. If you look at the big wind tunnel at Langley Research Center then you know how far it has come since then.

Last edited by rotorwrench; 11-10-2020 at 04:50 PM.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2020, 08:08 PM   #6
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 182
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
The Smithsonian didn't want the original Wright Flyer back in 1910 when it was offered due to the Langley bias.
I don't think it was ever offered to the Smithsonian in 1910, the feud was too bitter. In fact the Wrights spent a lot of time in Europe as they were getting a better reception there.

On the 3rd page of your link is a photo of Paul Garber, long time curator of the Air & Space museum. Paul was encyclopedic in his aviation knowledge, and I had the pleasure to meet him at a museum function years ago. Paul's FAA pilot license was signed by ... Orville Wright. Pretty cool. In meeting Paul I was one degree of separation away from meeting Orville, and that was a standout day.
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2020, 07:34 PM   #7
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,296
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

The Smithsonian was just the old castle and likely a few storage warehouses back in 1910 but it had been around since the Mexican war era so a lot of icons have been offered up over the many years of its existence. Both of the Wright brothers were still alive in 1910 and it was likely collecting dust in their digs. I don't doubt the museum's information much. They like to be on the up and up about American History.

The patent war over the airplane fundamentals was a lot bigger than any disagreement they may have had with the museum.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2020, 10:44 PM   #8
GRutter
Senior Member
 
GRutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Mint Hill, North Carolina
Posts: 236
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

I am soooo confused.
How can a thread titled 31 Budd Cab begin by talking about how fast there car can go and wind up talking about the Wright Flyer.
Did I miss something. Can we end this ?
GRutter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 08:51 AM   #9
McMimmcs
Senior Member
 
McMimmcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,204
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRutter View Post
I am soooo confused.
How can a thread titled 31 Budd Cab begin by talking about how fast there car can go and wind up talking about the Wright Flyer.
Did I miss something. Can we end this ?


I agree!
McMimmcs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 10:01 AM   #10
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,296
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Because the OP asked a question about a wind tunnel.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 10:39 AM   #11
Chuck Dempsey
Senior Member
 
Chuck Dempsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Waynesville, NC
Posts: 520
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Anyone know when auto makers starting using them? I'm guessing Chrysler with the 'Airflow' models, but just a guess....
Chuck Dempsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 10:50 AM   #12
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 182
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

What shall we talk about next? Florida? Whether hills would help? Where the steepest hill is in Florida? What states have a 90mph speed limit? Pictures of Model As going 90?

Speaking of which, what's the highest number on an oval speedometer? Don't think I know that one. If it doesn't go to 90, can you still say you did it?
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 11:17 AM   #13
Chuck Dempsey
Senior Member
 
Chuck Dempsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Waynesville, NC
Posts: 520
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Speaking of Florida, I believe Space Mountain and Splash Mountain are tied for highest mountains......
Chuck Dempsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 11:20 AM   #14
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 182
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Moose View Post
I don't think it was ever offered to the Smithsonian in 1910, the feud was too bitter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
The Smithsonian was just the old castle and likely a few storage warehouses back in 1910 but it had been around since the Mexican war era so a lot of icons have been offered up over the many years of its existence. Both of the Wright brothers were still alive in 1910 and it was likely collecting dust in their digs. I don't doubt the museum's information much. They like to be on the up and up about American History.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
The Smithsonian didn't want the original Wright Flyer back in 1910 when it was offered due to the Langley bias. Charles Walcott was dead set that Langley's old Aerodrome should have been the first successful powered airplane. The Smithsonian finally accepted it in 1948 and it is as original as it gets.
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitio...ght%20aircraft.
It doesn't completely surprise me the Smithsonian is still glossing over this event.

From Kill Devil Hill by Harry Combs, one of the best books written on the Wrights pg 346-7:

"This whole ugly [Langley] episode cast a shadow over the real accomplishments of the Wright brothers, a burden Orville was forced to carry alone for many years. This was the main reason Orville had refused to place the The Kitty Hawk Flyer in the Smithsonian. Instead, he kept it in storage; then in 1928 he sent it to the Science Museum in South Kensington London, on loan....

Eventually as a result of many concerned individuals and a concerned Congress, Orville accepted the Smithsonian's official apology, and The Flyer came home to rest..."


Feud was not the only word used to describe the Smithsonian's actions against the Wrights, fraud also has come to be written in the history. It is not a good page in the history of the Smithsonian.

Last edited by Mister Moose; 11-12-2020 at 11:31 AM.
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 12:25 PM   #15
Jim Brierley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 3,481
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Mister Moose, you can claim any speed you want, some will believe you, some will not, no matter what you post!
Jim Brierley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 01:43 PM   #16
rfitzpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 321
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

As a retired airline mechanic and '31 PicUp owner, I appreciate the information about the Wright Brothers
Thanks Guys
rfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2020, 07:15 PM   #17
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 182
Default Re: '31 Budd Cab

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Moose View Post
Speaking of which, what's the highest number on an oval speedometer? Don't think I know that one.
Went out to have a look. With a flashlight looking around the corner, my '30 built in December '29 speedometer tops out at 75mph.
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:50 AM.