Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-16-2021, 03:47 PM   #1
rfitzpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 360
Default Radios

Were there any Dealer-Installed radios in the Model A Era?
rfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 04:37 PM   #2
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 263
Default Re: Radios

Not really, if the era is 1928-1931.

In 1930 the Galvin brothers’ expensive $130 unit (a Model A Deluxe coupe cost $540) was the first commercially successful car radio, and the first product to wear the Motorola name.

In 1933 Crossley Motors offer a factory fitted car radio. By the late 1930s, push button AM radios were considered a standard feature.
Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 05-16-2021, 04:49 PM   #3
Oldgearz
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Sagle, Idaho
Posts: 95
Default Re: Radios

You'd have to have mighty young ears to hear a radio in MY Model A. How about yours?
Oldgearz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 05:19 PM   #4
rfitzpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 360
Default Re: Radios

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldgearz View Post
You'd have to have mighty young ears to hear a radio in MY Model A. How about yours?



Well. actually I had Turnswitch company take an old radio controller and build me one -- mounted the 'box' on the right-side kick panel, the controller is mounted on the steering column. I was having problems hearing it, so I bought a Motiograph Drive-In Theater Speaker, wired it in and installed it overhead in my Budd Cab. Sure helps, tho, I must wear hearing aids anyway. I'm retired airline mechanic with this hearing loss-

Thanks
rfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 08:04 PM   #5
Chris in WNC
Senior Member
 
Chris in WNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Pineville NC
Posts: 1,242
Default Re: Radios

In 1997 I drove my Tudor from Jacksonville Florida to Dayton Ohio for a national meet.
Took a side trip to see an old Ohio friend.
When he looked the car over he asked "How can you drive this far in a car with no radio?"
I told him listening to the engine run was music to my ears.......
__________________
1931 slant windshield Town Sedan
Chris in WNC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 08:38 PM   #6
nkaminar
Senior Member
 
nkaminar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Western North Carolina
Posts: 625
Default Re: Radios

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
My hearing aids will sometime tune in radio channels, or perhaps that is just voices generated inside my head. Hard to tell the difference sometimes.
__________________
A is for apple, green as the sky.
Step on the gas, for tomorrow I die.
Forget the brakes, they really don't work.
The clutch always sticks, and starts with a jerk.
My car grows red hair, and flies through the air.
Driving's a blast, a blast from the past.
nkaminar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 10:08 PM   #7
John Dayhuff
Senior Member
 
John Dayhuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Battle Creek, Michigan
Posts: 109
Default Re: Radios

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris in WNC View Post
"How can you drive this far in a car with no radio?"
I told him listening to the engine run was music to my ears.......
Exactly what I would have told him too........LOL.
__________________
John
John Dayhuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 11:52 PM   #8
Bill G
Senior Member
 
Bill G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Walla Walla, WA
Posts: 846
Default Re: Radios

With my hearing loss, music just isn't as enjoyable as it once was. I am perfectly happy with no radio.

The Model A ignition system is particularly prone to ignition noise on AM radio frequencies as it wasn't designed for a radio.

Since there was no radio that Ford offered for the Model A, none would be period correct, so a great way of listening would be to tie your smart phone into a small amp and speaker which these days can be small but mighty in sound. That way you aren't going to have to try to mount some great big box under the dash.
__________________
-Bill G
Member of Walla Walla Sweet A's Model A Club
Bill G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 06:40 AM   #9
ModelAMike1930
Senior Member
 
ModelAMike1930's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Illinois
Posts: 364
Default Re: Radios

I installed speakers in the kick panels and behind the seats. No problem hearing the radios.
ModelAMike1930 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 07:11 AM   #10
77Birdman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: North Eastern MD
Posts: 422
Default Re: Radios

If its music you are after, I bought a small blue tooth speaker to hook up with my phone. I paid $30 for it (JBL) although it sounds great on my desk my car is a bit loud (much louder than a model a) and it kinda gets drowned out. I am going to upgrade for the $70 version and see if its any better. Another thing I saw at best buy when I was getting the speaker was a pair of sunglasses with bose speakers built in. Those things were awesome, and expensive at a little over $200, but they did sound really good. I put out fathers day hints!
77Birdman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 09:36 AM   #11
700rpm
Senior Member
 
700rpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,685
Default Re: Radios

A friend joined me for a ride in my A a couple years ago, and brought a portable music device of some sort to listen while riding. I had to ask him to turn it off, becuase I need to listen to my car. A change in the sound of the car while driving can indicate potential trouble. For example: A fella in our club once heard a strange ticking sound while on tour. He stopped, opened the hood, and found his original fan blade was coming undone. Recently on a short drife my coupe set up an awful rattle. It turned out that one of the bolts that holds my manifold heater cover on had taken flight. I found it on the engine pan, reinstalled, and went on my way. Driving a Model A in today’s traffic requires all of my attention. I don’t want any distractions. Even conversation can be a problem.
__________________
Ray Horton, Portland, OR


As you go through life, keep your eye on the donut, not the hole.
700rpm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 11:44 AM   #12
Kurt in NJ
Senior Member
 
Kurt in NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: on the Littlefield
Posts: 5,489
Default Re: Radios

Grigsby Grunow 111 was the radio for 1932 Ford, I have a Grigsby Grunow 110, introduced June 1931, it has a steering column clamp that is made for the exact diameter of A steering column, I also have some installation instructions for early radios with detailed modifications for operation in model A
Kurt in NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 04:07 PM   #13
Mister Moose
Senior Member
 
Mister Moose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Hartford area, CT
Posts: 263
Default Re: Radios

My solution is to throw this on the back seat. Lasts for hours on a full charge.


Mister Moose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 05:15 PM   #14
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,616
Default Re: Radios

Those real early Grigsby Grunow radios were complicated sets. There were multiple components that had to be mounted.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 05:28 PM   #15
rfitzpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 360
Default Re: Radios

Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
Those real early Grigsby Grunow radios were complicated sets. There were multiple components that had to be mounted.



Yes. 1. Firewall Mounted Box (held all the electric stuff)
2. Steering Column Mounted Controller
3. Carter Genometer (i have no idea what this is/does)
4. Speaker
not to mention all the cables too
rfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2021, 05:33 PM   #16
jayvee34
Senior Member
 
jayvee34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: St. Augustine, Fl.
Posts: 190
Default Re: Radios

Good idea MISTER MOOSE. I have one like yours.
__________________
IN GOD WE TRUST - SEMPER FIDELIS
John
jayvee34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2021, 12:12 PM   #17
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,616
Default Re: Radios

They hadn't started using a vibrator circuit yet to step up voltages with the pulsating DC into a transformer. They used a DC Dynamotor that works a lot like an inverter to step up the low DC voltage to a high DC voltage to make the tubes work. These were used clear up and into WWII and later for long range recievers on aircraft and ships.

The Carter Genemotor was one of the brands of the day. Pioneer, GE, Black & Decker, Electrolux, and other motor manufacturing companies made Dynamotors.

Last edited by rotorwrench; 05-18-2021 at 12:21 PM.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2021, 03:37 PM   #18
JoeCB
Senior Member
 
JoeCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Farmington MI
Posts: 133
Default Re: Radios

School time , please... how did the Dynamotor work? Really a spinning motor flip-flopping the voltage to AC going to a transformer ? ... my guess

Joe B
JoeCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2021, 07:30 PM   #19
rotorwrench
Senior Member
 
rotorwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 12,616
Default Re: Radios

I can't explain for all of the different types on how they function other than they have a housing with two sets of fields and brush sets on both ends. The armature has commutators on both ends. The low voltage side turns the armature as a motor and the high voltage side generates the output voltage. The output voltage is likely multiplied from the input voltage in the way that the field coils are designed. The amperage output is likely not that high on these units even though they can have 400 to 500 volts generated. The input and output is always listed on the unit's data plate. This is a good link about them.
https://www.instructables.com/revivi...dios-went-mob/

This is a neat old catalog on Carter stuff:
https://www.abaa.org/book/844540590

Here is another link to a Carter model:
https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-736602410...e/n71/mode/1up

Last edited by rotorwrench; 05-19-2021 at 11:17 AM.
rotorwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2021, 07:04 PM   #20
mgambuzza
Senior Member
 
mgambuzza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 109
Default Re: Radios

Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
They hadn't started using a vibrator circuit yet to step up voltages with the pulsating DC into a transformer. They used a DC Dynamotor that works a lot like an inverter to step up the low DC voltage to a high DC voltage to make the tubes work. These were used clear up and into WWII and later for long range recievers on aircraft and ships.

The Carter Genemotor was one of the brands of the day. Pioneer, GE, Black & Decker, Electrolux, and other motor manufacturing companies made Dynamotors.
Years ago I was restoring a 1936 zenith radio that was a 6 V farm radio. It was amazing how such a simple technology using a vibrator circuit could enable a 6 V tractor battery to feed and make a tube radio work. They were truly genius in the day.
mgambuzza is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:24 PM.