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-   -   Interest in new restoration project thread? (https://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=267581)

Kube 11-08-2019 10:34 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

4 Attachment(s)
I tend to be very methodical during the process of restoration. That method seemingly keeps me from having to do things twice.
I measure, then measure again, and again - whatever is necessary. I trial fit all parts before any finish is applied.
All of the factory welds are removed and will be replaced when appropriate.
I am using a reproduction tail pan as well as the rear most trunk floor. Both pieces are "okay" as delivered. Okay at best. Both took quite a bit of massaging to get to fit properly.
The center floor pan is not available as reproduction and even though this one was beat up, it will be beautiful once reinstalled.
Note the tool tray was very solid. Most of the authentic tar paper lining remained intact.
This car was hit from behind at some point in its life. What I am unable to determine is why the floor was damaged as it was. the rear quarters have zero damage and zero repairs. The tail pan and rear most trunk floor were both damaged fairly bad.
I gut tells me two distinct causes. Tail pan? Simple rear end type accident. Floor? Perhaps something very heavy was tossed in there? hey, it happens. I'd restored a '40 coupe about six years ago that was 100% rust and dent free. Beautiful car to start with. Trunk floor was dented so badly, sheet metal stretched... turns out the previous owner threw an engine block in the trunk!

Kube 11-08-2019 10:51 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by 19Fordy (Post 1819056)
Thanks for posting the start of your new restoration.It will be a great documentation for the owner as well as other interested folks. The time and effort you take to do this is much appreciated. Be sure and take photos of "the small stuff" as that's often taken for granted as stuff folks already know. Will be following you. Love the way you lay the parts out so neatly for photos. I hope you will be able to feature this as part of your book. It would be a wonderful eye-opener. Thanks. Jim

Jim, The book will have zero in regard to restoration processes. My gosh man, it's been years of research to get this far on that (book) project. I can't imagine how much more time would be required to do a restoration phase. That sounds like a different book entirely. For someone else to do.
I do photograph most assemblies "before" and "after". I place them in a photo album side by side in an order leading up to the final end result.
I figure these will be my "coloring books" for when I am able to do little more than look at them and (hopefully) recall them :)
The horns depicted in the accompanying photos are from a '39 wagon I'd restored. The steering column from a '40 coupe.
If the cars are sold, a hard copy of the album is always included with the sale.

Mart 11-08-2019 10:52 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Wow. Thanks for posting the story so far mike. This is an excellent subject. While your and my approaches to restoration are at polar opposites, I really appreciate the way you do what you do.

Mart.

Kube 11-08-2019 10:55 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mart (Post 1819070)
Wow. Thanks for posting the story so far mike. This is an excellent subject. While your and my approaches to restoration are at polar opposites, I really appreciate the way you do what you do.

Mart.

What is your approach Mart?

Mart 11-08-2019 10:59 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Leave it alone as much as possible and just take care of any mechanical/safety issues. As I said in a previous post talking about over restoration: I said "I tend to under restore my heaps". Lol.

Kube 11-08-2019 11:02 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mart (Post 1819074)
Leave it alone as much as possible and just take care of any mechanical/safety issues. As I said in a previous post talking about over restoration: I said "I tend to under restore my heaps". Lol.

You're funny! And probably a lot more (mentally) healthy :)
Me? I can't leave any of them alone. Every one must be perfect! No doubt, it's a bit of a sickness. I'm okay with that!

deuce_roadster 11-08-2019 11:05 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Mike, since you have already done many of these, you probably already have enough pictures for you to assemble a "restoration" book of your own for sale. All you would need to do is minimal text for your steps and of course the sequence. No need to go into detail how to shrink metal, weld, wet sand, paint etc. Would be easy after you have decided you have restored enough cars.
Thanks for sharing your procedures as they can be relevant to any restoration, even brand X!

Kube 11-10-2019 09:02 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

2 Attachment(s)
I am currently preparing the frame for paint. Although a super nice frame - very straight and only a few pits, it did have the typical damage to a middle cross member.
I do repair all dings, waves, pits, etc. Then prime, wet sand and shoot single stage gloss black.

Don Rogers 11-10-2019 11:18 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Mike, I'm glad that you are making a distinction between a "how to restore" book and a "how did Henry make them" book. There are a lot of "how to restore" books and few "what was correct" books. Your efforts on behalf of a "factory correct" 1940 Ford are certainly appreciated. Once again, if you need any help putting the book together, let me know.

Kube 11-10-2019 11:32 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Rogers (Post 1819826)
Mike, I'm glad that you are making a distinction between a "how to restore" book and a "how did Henry make them" book. There are a lot of "how to restore" books and few "what was correct" books. Your efforts on behalf of a "factory correct" 1940 Ford are certainly appreciated. Once again, if you need any help putting the book together, let me know.

Don, I very much appreciate your kind offer. Lord knows you've earned my respect!

40ford 11-10-2019 01:29 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Kube,that looks almost like a dual exhaust cut-out some time long ago!I know my 40 had duals on it some time or another and the drivers side has been motified for exhaust.

Ol' Ron 11-10-2019 02:09 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Go for it, one of my favorite cars. I did a repaint in Black laquer, some new glass 37 DeSota bumpers etc. Nice car, sold it for 600 bucks, Raising a family, added another mouth.

Kube 11-10-2019 02:13 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by 40ford (Post 1819879)
Kube,that looks almost like a dual exhaust cut-out some time long ago!I know my 40 had duals on it some time or another and the drivers side has been motified for exhaust.

If I recall correctly, nearly every 39 - 40 I have ever restored has had damage to that brace.
I always figured it was some "backyard hack" to install a replacement exhaust. You know... why do it right when it's so much easier to hack out a chunk of the brace?

mhsprecher 11-10-2019 02:31 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Thanks for taking the time to do a thread. A lot of work is involved in putting one together. It is like writing a book, but with very short chapters.

Karl 11-11-2019 02:11 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kube (Post 1819075)
You're funny! And probably a lot more (mentally) healthy :)
Me? I can't leave any of them alone. Every one must be perfect! No doubt, it's a bit of a sickness. I'm okay with that!

You guys Stateside are so lucky compared with Mart and I . You have a lot more access to correct parts than we do. In my case 12000 miles of shipping really whacks up the restoration costs. I have spend a lot of money making my cars look right but a fine points guy would spot many things wrong with all of them. For example on my Model A the generator looks correct but is 6 months younger than my car-Getting the correct generator out of the States is feasible but not economically viable when only one person in 10,000 here would identify it as correct.

The distance means that our cars often don't follow the accepted time lines any way. My 1934 Fordor was registered in New Zealand In April 1934 but was probably assembled Stateside in Jan 1934 It has a combination of 33 and 34 Parts on it from new.

Due to our isolation and hence cost of new parts our cars have often been kept going with Farmers fixes over the years rather than expensive genuine parts . This again complicates restoration.

For the above reasons Fine point judging doesn't really exist over here. I wish it did -but then I'd be to scared to drive them

In short do you need any aging car mad Doctors in the States LOL !

Kube 11-11-2019 07:30 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

[QUOTE=Karl;1820079]You guys Stateside are so lucky compared with Mart and I . You have a lot more access to correct parts than we do. In my case 12000 miles of shipping really whacks up the restoration costs. I have spend a lot of money making my cars look right but a fine points guy would spot many things wrong with all of them. For example on my Model A the generator looks correct but is 6 months younger than my car-Getting the correct generator out of the States is feasible but not economically viable when only one person in 10,000 here would identify it as correct.


Karl, I have often admired you guys from across the great pond. I've shipped a lot of parts in your direction and as you'd stated, the shipping costs are insane.
I hope you are able to continue enjoying your hobby.

funrunr 11-11-2019 08:50 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Kube, Do you do all the restoration yourself? Example being for instance; the horns, generators and windings, rebuilding the clocks and parts like that? Where do you draw the line?
Once again, thanks for bringing us along.
Mark

Kube 11-11-2019 08:58 AM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by funrunr (Post 1820119)
Kube, Do you do all the restoration yourself? Example being for instance; the horns, generators and windings, rebuilding the clocks and parts like that? Where do you draw the line?
Once again, thanks for bringing us along.
Mark

Good morning Mark.

I do most of the work. However, some things are simply out of my hands.
Plating and most machining come to mind.

I used to be able to do the engine machining when employed as a tool maker. Unfortunately, after I'd retired, I'd lost access to the necessary machines.
Clocks you ask? More often than not, they simply need to be cleaned and lightly oiled.
I do rebuild the horns myself as well as generators, starters, transmissions, differentials, etc.
I now send my distributors, some fuel pumps and carburetors out to Charlie Schwendler. I used to do my own but find the minimal cost (of Charlie's work) along with the high quality, well, I just figure it is no longer worth my time / efforts to do them any longer.
I don't mount my tires or cut my own glass.

V8COOPMAN 11-11-2019 01:47 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

No doubt, Kubarth ("Kube") surely has restored an appreciable number of '39s and '40s over the last several years. I really don't understand how he is able to complete each in the seemingly-short time that he usually spends completing one. Of all the cars Mike has done over the years and has had judged, I've only managed to scrutinize two of his earlier restorations...the little blue coupe that shows in his avatar, and that now-infamous blue '40 Convert (with accompanying drink holder) that eventually ended-up selling out of the Dingman Collection for a reported $165K several years back. I remember Mike saying that that car judged ONLY 999 points, and that because of a 1-point deduction for two tiny pits in one of the rear axle housings. I honestly believe that the blue avatar coupe must surely be one of his favorites as Mike sold that coupe to someone in the northeast I believe, only to re-purchase it at a later date. I understand that he eventually sold it a second time, and have since heard that he would really like to have it back AGAIN. Almost kind of comical! But my whole point here is to express my thoughts about the extent of the detail and workmanship that Mike puts into these jewels by bringing attention to a couple of oft-overlooked and frequently forgotten areas for restoration. On the two "Kubarth" '40s that I'm familiar with above, you could look down past the roll-up windows in the doors and notice the result of what must have been some painstaking effort to make the insides and bottoms of those doors look just as pristine and finished as the paint on the fenders. Not only were the door innards a work of art, but the underside and rear of the instrument panel area along with the upper, inside of the dash (firewall) were finished every bit as nicely as any other part of the interior that shows in plain view. The guy seems to have this 1940 Ford restoration process about down to a science. I think that Mike really must be, by his own admission, one of those seriously-afflicted OCD types, as he seems to be the consummate artisan, always paying the utmost of attention to the minute details that make any "Kubarth Restoration" a significant work of note. DD

Flathead Youngin' 11-11-2019 02:34 PM

Re: Interest in new restoration project thread?
 

What a wonderful opportunity! For rookies, like myself, describe, for example, the frame process....






media blasting, filing , sanding, paint.....






Maybe I'm getting ahead of you. When I saw those horns, I was curious as to the steps of making them look so nice.






Thank you for your time, it's one thing to do a restore, it's another to take time and post about it all along the way...


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